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Friday, 25 May 2018

Milton Nascimento & Lo Borges “Clube da Esquina” 1972 Brazil Latin,Rock Pop,Folk,MPB


Milton Nascimento & Lo Borges  “Clube da Esquina” 1972 Brazil Latin,Rock Pop,Folk,MPB one of the best Brazilian albums…recommended..!
full spotify
https://open.spotify.com/album/0nSO875vzrNiNNaVcz5G0P


 Originally released in 1972, ‘Clube Da Esquina’ is the musical collective Milton helped found in his home state of Minas Gerais with Lo Borges, Wagner Tiso, Beto Guedes, Nelson Angelo and Toninho Horta. This album is almost certainly the finest example of the highly creative scene that arose from such an array of talent. From the opening chords of Brazilian Jazz dance anthem “Tudo Que Voce Podia Ser” to the baroque influences of “San Vicente”, via such Milton standards as “Cravo E Canela” and “Nada Sera Como Antes”, this double-album seamlessly weaves folk, rock, pop, MPB, jazz and even Beatlesque string influences into something distinct and utterly beautiful….~


In 1972, the Borges family lived in the bohemian neighborhood of Santa Tereza, in Belo Horizonte. There was born a song, a record and a movement. “Clube da Esquina”, the album and the song were released in 1972, when Lô was only 18 years old. Many might find it very much a responsibility to split an album with Milton Nascimento, as well as a lot of daring to record “A Sunflower of the Color of Your Hair” singing at the piano, with an orchestra ruled by Eumir Deodato, in only two channels. As if that were not enough, the disc still has “The Blue Train”, “Pier”, “Landscape of the Window”, “Nothing Is Like Before” and “Clube da Esquina nº 2”. The movement to which the disc gave the name was born from there. At the time it was released, “Clube da Esquina” received positive reviews, but the overwhelming majority could not recognize the genius there. Today, 32 years later, the album is revered as one of ten, if not one of the five most important albums of MPB…~


Clube Da Esquina is named after the Brazilian music artists collective that both Nascimento and Borges were a part of. Together with Tropicalia, Clube Da Esquina was the Brazilian musical movement that achieved the greatest international resonance in the post-bossa nova period. The collective collective originated in the Brazilian state of Minas Gerais and the album is filled with contributions from mineiros. The Clube Da Esquina style mixes rock and roll, progressive rock, bossa nova and jazz styles, with Brazilian country music and classical music influences. The album features many Clube Da Esquina hits, including: “Tudo Que Você Podia Ser,” “Cais,” “O Trem Azul,” “Caravo E Canela,” “Um Girassol da Cor do Seu Cabelo,” “San Vicente,” “Clube da Esquina No. 2,” and many others. Twenty-one tracks in all. Released by 4 Men With Beards on 180 gram double vinyl with a gatefold sleeve….~


i’m a disaffected trilingual 22-year-old with a permanent five o clock shadow and an exquisitely well-developed smoking habit who gets all but physically sick at the idea of doing what one must in order to do anything other than wait tables for a living but that’s okay because i know the complete works of rimbaud and neruda almost by heart and i look great when i sneer. and have i mentioned my heart of gold?…by…telephone junkie …..~


If anything shows the true diversity of Brazilian music its Milton Nascimento and Lo Borges’ “Clube da Esquina”, released in 1972. Another bonafide classic this album highlights the growth of influential music that Brazil could produce outside of its normal region of invention, Rio de Janeiro and Sao Paolo. Hailing from the Minas Gerais region, a much less tropical and more arid region, both Milton and Lo were raised in a locale where jobs were extremely few and far between, just getting by day to day required actual work many in the rest of Brazil wouldn’t dream of doing. For those two kids, and a couple of their musical friends, music was their release and opportunity. 
Both of them were uniquely gifted in that they learned by ear, how to play from a young age the complex chord progressions and rhythms that made them gain their early connections that brought them out of their boroughs. In a way, even they saw it themselves, their lives mimicked and were informed by the lives of John Lennon and Paul McCartney. They truly had distinct styles Milton’s was more abstract and free flowing, his early records were works of samba characterized by his unique vocal work that would cycle in range throughout a whole song. Lo was the McCartney of the group, his own work had very airy pop melodies and tender harmonies that could be best described as dreamy. At one point they struck on the idea to combine their forces and see if they could match or top their own influences.
It was obvious to them that it would be their own background, found distinctly in the western region of Brazil, that could let them add a progressive pop feel that most any listener hadn’t quite encountered before. This is the sound you hear throughout this record, rather than copy the Beatles, they took the collective feeling and sound that touched them as kids and reconfigured it for their time. The album has vignette updates of songs like “Sun King”, “Julia”, or even “Arnold Layne” from the Floyd. As a listener its obvious where some of the inspiration comes from but the way they tweak the existing formula is just damn brilliant. By injecting their own regional musical influence into the music of their idols, they found a way to attain that success. I mean this in album that even spawned a museum in Brazil just dedicated to the history behind its creation. 
To this day, songs like “O Trem Azul”, “Clube da Esquina 2”, “Saidas e Bandeiras”, or “San Vicente” just startle because of how modern they sound. Its a testament to their whole collective finding a way to make a new kind of statement. For a lot of the members of the collective this would be the totem they could use to strike out new monuments…more of that soon. Just so you know, the album cover isn’t of them as kids, they were just two kids they saw and took pictures while driving around their neighborhood (the cover served as a way to remind themselves of where they came from)…..~







Tracklist 

Tudo que você podia ser (Márcio Borges, Lô Borges) 
Cais (Milton Nascimento, Ronaldo Bastos) 
O trem azul (Lô Borges, Ronaldo Bastos) 
Saídas e Bandeiras nº 1 (Milton Nascimento, Fernando Brant) 
Nuvem cigana (Lô Borges, Ronaldo Bastos) 
Cravo e canela (Milton Nascimento, Ronaldo Bastos) 
Dos cruces (Carmelo Larrea) 
Um girassol da cor de seu cabelo (Márcio Borges, Lô Borges) 
San Vicente (Milton Nascimento, Fernando Brant) 
Estrelas (Márcio Borges, Lô Borges) 
Clube da Esquina nº 2 (Lô Borges, Milton Nascimento) 
Paisagem na janela (Lô Borges, Fernando Brant) 
Me deixa em paz (Ayrton Amorim, Monsueto) 
Os povos (Márcio Borges, Milton Nascimento) 
Saídas e Bandeiras nº 2 (Milton Nascimento, Fernando Brant) 
Um gôsto de Sol (Milton Nascimento, Ronaldo Bastos) 
Pelo amor de Deus (Milton Nascimento, Fernando Brant) 
Lilia (Milton Nascimento, Fernando Brant) 
Trem de doido (Márcio Borges, Lô Borges) 
Nada será como antes (Milton Nascimento, Ronaldo Bastos) 
Ao que vai nascer (Milton Nascimento, Fernando Brant) 

Junior Parker “Love Ain’t Nothin’ But A Business Goin’ On” 1971 US Soul Funk Blues


Junior Parker “Love Ain’t Nothin’ But A Business Goin’ On” 1971 US Soul Funk Blues
full vk
https://vk.com/wall-53831823_14949


full spotify

https://open.spotify.com/album/7GfXQoLmiNnKCe9twujVim

full deezer

https://www.deezer.com/fr/album/13666990


One of the funkiest albums ever from Junior Parker – a great little set that shows he had a lot more to offer than just the average bluesman! The album’s got a nice little soul sound in the backings – tight rhythms from Horace Ott, who nicely avoids a lot of the cliches that the blues business was hitting at the time – in order to keep Junior in hip territory that’s filled with breaking drums and heavy basslines! There’s a few key crossover tracks here, plus some surprisingly sweeter numbers – and the album’s a gem through and through – well-appreciated by new generations over the years, thanks to its diversity of tracks!….~


Junior Parker does not appear to play any harmonica on LOVE AIN’T NOTHIN’ BUT A BUSINESS GOIN’ ON but it is his vocals that take center stage. 
It did not take long for me to remember upon hearing “Darling Depend On Me” that Junior Parker wrote and performed “Stand By Me” in 1960 (Ben E. King’s eventual smash hit). Although Parker is credited with writing only one song (“The Outside Man”) it appears this album was produced to give Junior that big hit he deserved. There are two others songs that also have that ‘hit’ love, broken heart song potential “I Wonder Where our Love has Gone” and “You Know I Love You” complete with pretty or aching 'orchestra of strings’ and/or the wail of the 'in-love’ saxophone. 
It’s too bad there are no band credits for these respectable session players although there, apparently, is more than a rumor the electric guitarist is O'donnel Levy(?) 
But, this 1971 recording delivers a funky bass when needed and three new versions of songs written by three ex-Beatles that are all given a R & B feel, especially the slowed down dialogue beat of “Taxman”. Quite unique. 
I’ve also heard “The River’s Invitation” before and this also has a fine modern R & B feel to what had basically been a blues song. 
All and all, I have never been a big fan of the R & B sound but This “Business” is just difficult not to listen to – again. 
As far as I know LOVE AIN’T NOTHIN’ BUT A BUSINESS GOIN’ ON was not a successful 70’s album hit. Difficult to understand why it was not (a 70’s hit). 
After listening to Junior’s “can you dig it vocals” I don’t recalling ever feeling so retro-hip in my life. 
I had some reservations about 10 songs covering 34 minutes for 17 bucks. But, not after listening — again and again — to Junior Parker’s everyman, honeyed, heartfelt vocals … 'Sweet’, smooth and groovin’…..by… a walther…~

Tracklist 
A1 Love Ain’t Nothin’ But A Business Goin’ On (Written-By: Bobby Adams (2)) 3:20 
A2 The Outside Man (Written-By: Parker Written-By: Van Leer Written-By: Moore) 3:12 
A3 Darling Depend On Me (Written-By: D. Robey Written-By: F. Washington) 3:43 
A4 Taxman (Written-By: George Harrison) 3:42 
A5 Rivers Invitation (Written-By: Percy Mayfield) 2:45 
B1 I Wonder Where Our Love Has Gone (Written-By: Buddy Johnson) 3:38 
B2 Just To Hold My Hand (Written-By: Don Robey) 3:51 
B3 You Know I Love You (Written-By: R. King Written-By: J. Taub) 3:33 
B4 Lady Madonna (Written-By: J. Lennon-P. McCartney) 2:12 
B5 Tomorrow Never Knows (Written-By: J. Lennon-P. McCartney) 3:25 

Trio Mocotó “Samba Rock"2001 CD Brazil Samba Rock,Latin Funk


Trio Mocotó “Samba Rock"2001 CD Brazil Samba Rock,Latin Funk 
full bandcamp
https://triomocoto.bandcamp.com/album/samba-rock

full spotify

https://open.spotify.com/album/5aEvx8thqk7yiwO1rKTx9B


The unique samba soul sound of legendary ‘70s band Trio Mocotó returned in 2001 with ‘Samba Rock’, their first release since 1975. First brought to fame as Jorge Ben’s original backing band, the Trio’s three founding members Fritz, Nereu and João Parahyba (more recently known as Suba’s right-hand man) came back to rock the boat, bringing their energy and good vibes into our souls and dancefloors once again. Referred to by many as the “Fathers of the samba soul beat”, the band was formed in the late '60s and recorded three albums, which have now become collectors’ items sought out by DJs the world over. The Trio was back at full strength: their super-original grooves and vocals, their innovative power and tremendous humor and charm are not only intact, they are rejuvenated by Fritz, Nereu and João Parahyba’s fresh new take on the style they contributed to create…..~

Waiting 26 years between releases has to be some kind of record. But so is Samba Rock. Having first gained notoriety as Jorge Ben’s backing band in 1969, Brazilian "samba soul” pioneers Trio Mocotó released three influential albums in the 1970s before packing it up. Renewed interest in vintage Latin recordings spurred the Trio to reunite for their latest release, and it’s far from an exercise in nostalgia. The group holds on to its core style of innovative vocal arrangements and flirtations with soul, funk, and jazz while also presenting a cartoonish ambiance that leaves lesser mortals frowning in the dust. But the 21st-century Trio also seamlessly blends modern sensibilities with its venerable minimoog, updating “Voltei Amor” with subtle electronica and energizing Jorge Ben’s “Adelita” with a vigorous tropical rock attack that complements the all-out party atmosphere. Even Antonio Carlos Jobim’s classic “Aguas de Marco” (“The Waters of March”) gets an unexpectedly loosey-goosey reading via an instrumental whose lead voice is provided by the percussive whine of the cuica (best known for the background whoops in Paul Simon’s “Me and Julio Down by the Schoolyard”). Backed by supple horn players, keyboardists, drummers, and more, the Trio miraculously fuses various styles from different eras without ever straining the essential samba sensibility. While the out-there approach may not suit every listener, it will definitely delight anyone with a healthy sense of fun. –Bob Tarte……..~
First, I’d have to agree with Amazon’s chosen critical review wholeheartedly. It isn’t that the group sounds like Brave Combo as such, but they do have a similar, unleashed sense of fun romping around various musical styles, and sometimes you end up with a huge, somewhat baffled smile on your face. “Cyrano” sounds like a strange combination of 70’s rock, samba, and theme music for a TV show of the Munsters variety. It is a blast. “Pensando Nela” is a bossa nova with a really relaxed, happy groove and a consciously loungy air that will have you smiling even if, as the case with me, you generally don’t care for songs of that description. In his famous song “Chiclete com Banana,” Jackson do Pandeiro satirically called for a fusion of American and Brazilian music he named “samba-rock.” He would definitely enjoy these unimagined results. Have yourself a “Tudo Bem” day…… John P. Rickert….~

Contrary to part of its title and for those of you who may not be so familiar with Brazilian music or Brazilian terminology of music, this is not a rock CD or in any way a fusion of samba and rock music. Instead it is a delightful collection of original, funk-soul-samba inspired songs with a dash of modern ingredients. Trio Mocoto is a wonderful, soulful group who performed with the great Jorge Ben in the 70’s and had a lot of success during that era when funk-soul-samba fusion music was at an alltime high. They were and still continue to be one of the best groups from that era and have had more staying power than other equally talented groups/artists from that era (like Banda Black Rio, Azymuth, Wilson Simonal, Tim Maia, etc.), whom many of them unfortunately died out with the passing of the 70’s and early 80’s. A wonderful CD to revive the career of a wonderful group! Every song is energetic, original and equally as good as the other, I highly recommend checking out this CD. You will not be disappointed…..by…. M Katayama…..~

A mocoto’ is a cut of meat, and apparently in carioca slang a few decades ago it was sometimes meant to describe a woman with shapely legs. This trio was Jorge Ben’s band for some of his best work, and now they reappear with one of the greatest party albums imaginable. With Jorge Ben-like ease, they swing through these loose and loopy numbers with tremendous instrumental prowess. Great imagination in the arrangements, with the cuica 'singing’ the melody of 'Aguas de Marco’ being the obvious example. This is what the 60’s would have sounded like with digital technology. This dinosaur band has come back to like in the very prime of life, apparently. (How often does that happen?) Simply put, every track makes you want to dance and this album does not disappoint anyone seeking an injection of funky soulful Brazilian rock. Swing it, baby…..by.. Eric C…..~

A new album after a hiatus of some 25 years?! 
Instead of leaving the battlefield of re-awakened demand for Brazilian beats (due to the lounge compilations) to the copycats, Trio Mocotó decided to deliver the original groove. 
As if no time passed, those three guys lay down an album full of infectious beats and melodies as if there was nothing to it. Those tight, jazzy, funky beats keep coming, this is just the right CD for a BBQ or after dinner, to get the digesting crowd on their hoofs. 
I just can’t understand why such a super group would remain unnoticed to the iniciated RYM community!…by….yofriend ….~

The Trio Mocotó is a group that shaped a style that would be known as samba-rock, resulting in the fusion of the two genres. The trio influenced many artists who were searching for some kind of fusion between Brazilian and American pop music, like Tim Maia and Jorge Ben, whom they backed in recordings and performances both in Brazil and internationally. 

The trio was formed in 1968 in the Jogral nightclub (São Paulo) by Fritz Escovão, Joãozinho Parahyba, and Nereu Gargalo, who were the regular backing musicians for the featured artists, such as Clementina de Jesus, Nelson Cavaquinho, Cartola, and other performers. The Jogral was one of the most important nightclubs of Brazil in that time, and international artists like Duke Ellington, Oscar Peterson, and Earl Hines also performed there, accompanied by the Trio Mocotó. As Jorge Ben (later Jorge Ben Jor) used to sit in often, the trio became Ben’s backup band. The result was the sound that Ben was searching for, a kind of fusion between samba and rock. The trio accompanied Ben in virtually all the tracks on Ben’s album Jorge Ben (Philips, 1969). As Ben’s supporting band for the performance of “Charles Anjo 45” at the IV Festival Internacional da Canção, the trio had to choose a name, so Mocotó was adopted as a reference to a slang word for ladies’ legs. (The polemical and somewhat aggressive song was met with massive booing in the packed Maracanãzinho). “Eu Quero Mocotó,” another composition by Ben (dedicated to ladies’ legs, not to the trio), was also performed in the same festival by Erlon Chaves and Banda Veneno, with Ben and the trio as guests. 

During the early '70s, the trio was very busy. They hit the charts with the single “Coqueiro Verde” (Roberto Carlos/Erasmo Carlos) and soon departed to Cannes, France, where they accompanied Ben in his performance at MIDEM (which launched a European tour with the composer/musician). In Japan they all recorded a live album (unreleased at the time in Brazil). Upon their return, they accompanied Ben and Toquinho for the recording of “Que Maravilha” and departed once more for an international tour with Ben. Returning to Brazil, they were invited by Toquinho and Vinícius de Moraes to back them in some recordings as well as accompanying them (together with Marília Medalha) in the Encontro show, touring the country in the college circuit, and then through Mexico. 

Their first LP came in 1971, Muita Zorra! Ou São Coisas Que Glorificam a Sensibilidade Atual (Philips), followed by two others in 1973 (RGE) and 1975. With advent of the disco craze and the subsequent waning of interest in live music, the group ran out of work and dissolved. In 2000, after 24 years without performing together, they teamed up again to play in the Jô Soares TV show commemorating the group’s 30th anniversary. ~ Alvaro Neder….allmusic….~

“Trio Mocotó is a Brazilian band, originally formed in 1968 in the Jogral nightclub in São Paulo, and reformed in 2000. The group was influential in forming the musical style that became known as samba rock or samba soul. In 1969, they were backing Jorge Ben, being featured on seminal albums Força Bruta, Negro É Lindo and Tábua de Esmeralda. 

In 1971, they had a hit with the single "Coqueiro Verde” (written by Erasmo Carlos). Their return to the studios with Samba Rock in 2001 was followed by tours and live appearance in main music festivals in Europe and Japan, with renewed energy and public. The group received in 2001 the APCA (São Paulo Art Critics Association ) award for Best Group, and in 2006 Nereu’s album as solo artist “Samba Power” received again the APCA, this time with Best Album of the Year.“ wiki 

The band’s early material is definitely better suited to The Crypt as it more Samba Jazz (I’ll post a 1974 set with Dizzy Gillespie over there soon), this one is a whole different animal entirely! All three guys had remained very active during their 25 years apart and had absorbed all kinds of new sounds and rhythms including rock, soul and hip hop. It all combines in a wonderful, fun ride here. You will not be able to sit still for very long with this one coming out of your speakers!!!….~

Tracklist

Trio Mocoto - Voltei Amor 
Trio Mocoto - Tudo Bem 
Trio Mocoto - Pensando Nela 
Trio Mocoto - Adelita 
Trio Mocoto - Os Orixas 
Trio Mocoto - Aguas De Marco 
Trio Mocoto - Nao Sei Porque 
Trio Mocoto - Kriola 
Trio Mocoto - A Tonga Da Mironga Do Kabulete 
Trio Mocoto - Kibe Cru 
Trio Mocoto - Nereu Nereu 
Trio Mocoto - Cyrano Do Beijorac 
Trio Mocoto - Mocoto Beat 
Trio Mocoto - Fui 





watch….
Trio Mocotó ‎ “Trio Mocotó” 1973 Brazil Latin Funk, Samba Funk 

watch
Trio Mocotó “Muita Zorra” 1971 Brazil latin funk soul Samba Rock 

watch
Trio Mocotó ‎” Trio Mocotó" 1977 Brazil Latin Funk,Samba Soul 

Trio Mocotó ‎" Trio Mocotó" 1977 Brazil Latin Funk,Samba Soul


Trio Mocotó ‎" Trio Mocotó" 1977 Brazil Latin Funk,Samba Soul
full vk
https://vk.com/wall312142499_10714



At the bottom of a crate laid an abandoned record with a mysterious cover featuring 7 musicians depicted in pointillism style with a funky orange and pink font. I later found out that this version was the Italian edition released on CAM (pictured below). It was the visual that caught my attention, and within the opening seconds of the first track, I knew I had hit the jackpot. 
The delicate opening with the build up of strings, brass and the repetitive but shy piano, confirmed instantly that this funky samba gem was going to be mine forever. 
“Nao Adianta” introduces Trio Mocoto’s eponymous record (1977, Arlequim) perfectly. I fell in love with the rhythm of this monumental and audacious song, it fills me with an optimistic nostalgia. The song’s bridge with the piano notes repeating frenetically, the arrival of the flute and impossible orchestrations of violons are all keys to the prodigious arrangements behind the song.
Known for their mixture of funk, jazz fusion and soul with samba, Trio Mocoto formed in Sao Paulo in 1968. The trio was one of Jorge Ben‘s main backing bands, they were a big influence on the sound of the king of Brazilian samba rock on many tours and records, including his eponymous 1969 record which had a deep influence on the Tropicalia movement. Sadly, the group dissolved after the recording this lovely record and made a comeback in the 2000’s that went unnoticed by Brazilian music fans. 

The term Mocoto is slang reference to the legs of young ladies. This record is a must for all lovers who want a deeper approach to feel-good music…..by….Marilou Lyonnais ….~






Tracklist 
Não Adianta 4:11 
O Meu Violão 3:28 
A Rosa 3:51 
Xuxu Melão 3:18 
Doca 3:59 
Toda Tarde 3:27 
Sossega Malandro 3:08 
Dilê 6:48 
Onde Anda Voce 2:49 
Que Nega É Essa 5:11 



watch
Trio Mocotó “Samba Rock"2001 CD Brazil Samba Rock,Latin Funk 
https://johnkatsmc5.blogspot.gr/2018/05/trio-mocoto-samba-rock2001-cd-brazil.html

watch….
Trio Mocotó ‎ “Trio Mocotó” 1973 Brazil Latin Funk, Samba Funk 


watch
Trio Mocotó “Muita Zorra” 1971 Brazil latin funk soul Samba Rock 

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